Luck will cost you

…but you’ll find faith on the sale rack at Target

faith.luck.target.final

My recent shopping trip took me on an unexpected turn toward the existential.

 

It’s not every day one sees luck and faith available for purchase — and with faith on clearance.

 

The iphone in my pocket begged to take a picture. I would have loved sending it to Instagram (or Facebook or Twitter). And the right hashtag (#Targetfunny or #faithluckonsale) to underscore the experience.

 

But there were errands to run, and I thought maybe I’d circle back to the idea later on.

 

And just like any yoga nerd, I felt it lingering in the back of my mind.

 

Why couldn’t I just be contented with having a good laugh about it with my husband?

 

Because I have to create meaning out of the mundane, and often where this is none. That’s just how I roll.

 

Still, who wouldn’t be captivated?

I found the holy grail of a happy life – in the aisles of the East Memphis Target!

Clearly some sales executive higher-up deemed luck to be a little more valuable than faith. The powers-that-be slashed a few prices — and voila — the value of faith declined by 50%.

I knew the Pantanjali’s Yoga Sutras had something to say about this and wondered if he’d also thrown in any ideas about luck.

So I looked it up.

I found some talk of faith. And very little on luck.

The word “faith” can be a loaded word for many. It can be seen as something religious or spiritual or even out-dated. It brings up early childhood experiences in incense-filled cathedrals and Jesus’ “faith of a mustard seed” speech.

Substituting the word “trust” has been a good alternative for me. 

Trust can be something like a seed that develops little by little. BKS Iyengar says that trust comes with experience. He describes faith as “felt trust” and says that it is instinctive. And then develops with effort and reflecting on one’s own experience.

There have been times when I’ve found it hard to have trust or faith — even in my yoga practice.

But I still do it. (Yes, and sometimes even just think about doing it).

I see results. I understand faith through my experience. Over time, I am able to believe that yoga can be of help. And that makes faith worth something to me.

As for luck, I’ve seen a lot of it. I’ve been at the right place at just the right time too often to doubt my good luck.

Luck can provide valuable resources. But I’ve found that, unlike faith or trust, there are very few actions I can take to create more luck.

Except maybe shop at Target, and be willing to pay full price.

There is no such thing as “not flexible enough for yoga”

Screen Shot 2013-12-21 at 6.30.30 PMIf you can walk, you can do yoga.

And even if you can’t walk, you can do yoga.

I love this time of year because of all the holiday parties. My husband and I make the rounds to see friends and family, and an extended network of neighbors and acquaintances we’ve developed in our many years of living in Memphis.

There are some people that I see only at this time of year. It’s great to catch up and hear what people have been up to, and swap stories about the previous year.

Sometimes people want to talk about yoga.

There are several refrains that I commonly hear when I am out and about.

  • I wish I could do yoga but I’m not flexible at all.
  • I can’t even touch my toes.
  • I could never touch my toes.
  • My hands (or wrists) can’t bear weight so I can’t do yoga.
  • I went to a yoga class once and it was too hard.
  • Yoga is not enough of a workout for me. I like an intense workout where I sweat.
  • My doctor says I’m too flexible (or stiff or old or injured or blah blah blah) for yoga.
  • My mother told me I’d never have good posture.

None of these things have anything to do with your ability to do yoga.

If you want to practice yoga, you will find a way.

You will try teacher after teacher until you find the one who is the right fit for you.

When people talk to me about yoga when we are just hanging out, I take that to mean that they are interested in it.  Even when what they are saying is why they can’t do it.

If you have heard yourself (or a friend) saying any of the above, let’s talk.

Sometimes you have to overcome your “can’ts,” “nots,” and “never haves,” before you can find your “will, your “want to,” and your “must do.”

I’d love to help you find your way.

Email me.

Welcome Wayne Knerr!

Wayne Knerr, MaOM, LMT, NCTMB

Wayne Knerr is back in Memphis, and we are happy that he chose to locate his practice at EYC.  Our studio renovation made it possible for Wayne to begin his practice here last month.

After practicing in Memphis for 17 years, Wayne moved to Boston in 2007 to study Oriental Medicine at the New England School of Acupuncture (NESA).  He graduated from NESA in August with a Master’s Degree in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine.

Currently his skill set for pain management/mind-body interactions includes Cranio-Sacral Therapy, Visceral Manipulation, Intuitive Healing and Standard Process Nutritional Supplements.

Although he has passed Foundations, Biomedicine, and Acupuncture Point Board Tests that would allow him to practice in Tennessee, Wayne has elected for an Oriental Medicine license, which means that he will have one more board test to complete — the Chinese Herbology Test.

If all goes well, he expects to receive his license to practice acupuncture in December.

Contact Wayne for an appointment or for more information at 662-519-1287 or via email at wayneknerr44@gmail.com