April 2016

Inside job

 

 

“The body is your temple. Keep it pure and clean for the soul to reside in.”
-BKS Iyengar

 

Lately I’ve been thinking about ways to describe yoga. Especially to new people who are asking questions about yoga. What is yoga? Will it help me lose weight? What do you do in a class? Why do you spend so much time teaching/studying/practicing?

When I first started thinking about how to describe yoga to people, my  purpose was to come up with ways to “market” yoga and Iyengar Yoga. I wanted to help people find us, come to class, and introduce them to our practice.

I think about marketing sometimes. As a studio we depend on having students. Without students, there is no studio. And it is no secret that the practicalities of paying the rent, keeping the lights on, utilities and so forth are important considerations.

It is in the “marketing” of yoga where I get stuck. It’s hard to describe Iyengar Yoga to those who have not experienced it for themselves.

Of course, I could quote the benefits of yoga:
relieve stress!
gain strength!
heal from injuries & chronic conditions.

I can cite articles with the scientific research backed by statistics on percentages of people who have achieved relief from pain and calmed their anxiety.

The usual attention-grabbing advertising words do not work here.

But there are benefits other than the surface ones. These are hard to describe.
Common advertising language has no words to describe yoga practice. Sure, the physical benefits attract people, but those who continue to practice over a period of months and years do so because the yoga gives them more than a healthy body.

Those who stick with it find something deeper. I could say “rich, deep, and profound.”

Even these descriptions fall far short of describing what yoga brings. Yoga is the ability to quiet the mind. It helps us provide a deeper experience of who we are — and we turn inward.

After 20 years of practice,  I am just now starting  to crave a deeper connection to myself…

Wanting to shift my attention inward. Wanting to focus less on the externals.

I have not always been interested in this.

It can be scary to go to an unfamiliar place. And spending time with myself and my ever-wandering mind has never souned appealing.

What will I find there? Maybe nothing. Maybe something  I’d rather not see. Or maybe I can catch a glimpse of a new, less external (what am i wearing? how can I be fit?) way of living.

Inner connection has never been on my to-do list. Until now. And I can see that is a process — it comes in stages.

My first stage toward change has been to wish I wanted to.
And in the case of big changes, I am only capable of being willing to want to change.
These stages can last a very very long time before any real work happens.

I find myself in the middle of it now. Maybe you do too.

It helps to hear what others have to say on the subject.

Here’s what John O’Donohue, the Irish poet/philosopher says:

“The body is your only home in the universe. It is your house of belonging here in the world. It is a very sacred temple. To spend time in silence before the mystery of your body brings you toward wisdom and holiness.” – O’Donohue

“The body is your temple. Keep it pure and clean for the soul to reside in.” – Iyengar